After Election, Attention Turns to President Obama’s Immigration Plans

Written by on November 5, 2014 in Elections, Enforcement, Executive Action with 3 Comments

4812860637_53f152b248_oAfter last night’s midterm elections, Republicans will control both the House and Senate for the last two years of President Obama’s administration. The GOP won Senate seats in at least seven states to give them a majority, and the party held onto its control of the House.

That Republicans would control both chambers was to be expected even before Tuesday night if you look at past elections. The last four two-term presidents, from Eisenhower to George W. Bush, “concluded their final two years in office without the support of either house of Congress,” according to the Huffington Post. Hidden in this typical shift in control of Congress is that voters still want meaningful reform. An exit poll asked voters what to do about “most illegal immigrants working in the U.S.” Voters nationwide preferred “offered legal status” over “deportation” 57 percent to 39 percent.

And polls show that immigration was a defining and personal issue this year for Latino voters. According to Latino Decisions, 45 percent of Latino voters said immigration reform was the most important issue facing the Latino community that politicians should address. Two-thirds said immigration was either the most important or “one of the important issues” in their decision to vote and for whom. Exit polls also show that 64 percent of Latino voters who turned out supported Democrats, but Latinos only made up 8 percent of voters on Tuesday, compared to 10 percent in 2012.

Some commentators are saying that President Obama’s decision to delay taking administrative action on immigration until after the election did more harm than good. As CBS’ Major Garrett explains, the president decided to hold off until after the election to help vulnerable Senate Democrats in Republican-leaning states. But Garrett reports that the move backfired in states like Colorado, Georgia, and Iowa, which have a growing number of Latino voters. “He demobilized Latino activists across the country,” Gary Segura of Latino Decisions told Garrett.

Additionally, Ryan Grim and Sam Stein of the Huffington Post write that there was little benefit for Democrats after Obama chose not to act on immigration before the election. Instead of boosting enthusiasm among Latino voters, they explain, “The only tangible effect of the delay may have been the deportation of thousands of people who could have been helped by executive action.”

It’s time to move forward. President Obama said Wednesday at a press conference that he would “take whatever lawful actions I can take” by the end of the year. The election is over now, and it is time for President Obama to act on immigration and hopefully provide temporary relief from deportation for millions of undocumented immigrants who continue to wait for a permanent solution from Congress.

Photo by Number 10.

Tags: , , , ,

Subscribe

If you enjoyed this article, subscribe now to receive more just like it.

Subscribe via RSS Feed
  • el.sol

    Whoever, advised the president to delay Executive Action on Immigration Reform should be canned,fired and kicked to the curb. He lost three seats, but could have retained 3 more by sticking to his word and done immigration reform in September.

  • mike

    I taught constitutional law for ten years. I take the constitution very seriously. The biggest problem that we’re facing right now has to do with George Bush trying to bring more and more power into the executive branch and not go through Congress at all, and that’s what I intend to reverse when I’m president of the United States of America. (Sen. Obama at a Townhall in Lancaster, PA, March 31, 2008)

  • Michael2255

    Not only did he not do anything, he decided to broadcast he would do something. This only raised uncertianty in immigrant communities (depressing their turnout) and energized the tea partiers (increasing their turnout). Just dumb.

Top
2K Shares
Share
Tweet
Share
+1