Amy Grenier

Amy Grenier was the Administrative and Research Assistant at the Immigration Policy Center. Amy has a B.A. in History from Hollins University and an M.A. in Migration Studies from the University of Sussex, where she wrote her thesis on federalism, immigration, and state level activism in the United States. She also studied briefly at Ho Chi Minh International University, where a course on the Vietnamese diaspora piqued her interest in immigrant communities in the United States. Previously, she has interned for the U.S. Committee for Refugees and Immigrants, served as a volunteer coordinator for a refugee charity in the United Kingdom, and worked as a legal secretary for a regulatory law firm.

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Law Professors Affirm Obama’s Immigration Action Within Legal Authority

Written by on November 25, 2014 in Executive Action with 4 Comments
Law Professors Affirm Obama’s Immigration Action Within Legal Authority

Today, more than a hundred legal scholars released a letter after reviewing the President Obama’s announced executive actions on immigration, that confirms that his plan for immigration action is “within the legal authority of the executive branch” of the United States. The letter, spearheaded by Hiroshi Motomura of University of California, Los Angeles, School of […]

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20 Years Later, California Still Feels Effects of Anti-Immigrant Measure

Written by on November 7, 2014 in State and Local with 3 Comments
20 Years Later, California Still Feels Effects of Anti-Immigrant Measure

Saturday marks 20 years since 59 percent of Californians voted for a measure designed to reduce the number of undocumented immigrants in the state, a policy that backfired and led to a massive political shift. The measure was Proposition 187, part of 1994’s “Save Our State” initiative, and its repercussions are still being felt today. […]

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Why Immigration Helps African American Employment

Why Immigration Helps African American Employment

An old myth about African Americans and immigrants resurfaced on Monday thanks to a series of over-reactions to a U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) procurement order. In the complicated world of government procurement, the government has to plan for purchases far in advance, even if it ultimately doesn’t purchase everything on its list.  Consequently, […]

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New Evidence Confirms Immigrant Children Show Up in Immigration Court

Written by on October 14, 2014 in Immigration Courts with 2 Comments
New Evidence Confirms Immigrant Children Show Up in Immigration Court

As many of the unaccompanied minors who crossed the U.S-Mexico border earlier this summer navigate the immigration court system, recent government numbers confirm that the vast majority are showing up for their immigration hearings. Data released by the U.S. Executive Office for Immigration Review (EOIR) shows that between July 18 and the end of September, […]

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Proposed Refugee Program Limited in Central American Impact

Written by on October 3, 2014 in Humanitarian Protection, Refugee Status with 0 Comments
Proposed Refugee Program Limited in Central American Impact

Earlier this week, President Obama issued a memo that set the refugee cap at 70,000 refugees for the 2015 fiscal year. This is the same cap as Fiscal Year 2014, but the 2015 regional allotment for Latin America and the Caribbean decreased to 4,000 from 5,000. This region includes Honduras, Guatemala, and El Salvador, the […]

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Landmark Decision on Asylum Claims Recognizes Domestic Violence Victims

Written by on September 2, 2014 in Asylum, Humanitarian Protection with 3 Comments
Landmark Decision on Asylum Claims Recognizes Domestic Violence Victims

Last week, the Board of Immigration Appeals (BIA) issued a landmark decision that recognizes that women who have experienced domestic violence may be deemed a “member of a particular social group” which would help support a potential asylum case. The case, Matter of A-R-C-G-, arrives at a time when many Central American women and children […]

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Iranian-American Woman Breaks Glass Ceiling with Math Prize

Written by on August 21, 2014 in Employment and Wages, Integration with 0 Comments
Iranian-American Woman Breaks Glass Ceiling with Math Prize

The Fields Medal is frequently called the “Nobel Prize” of mathematics, and since it was first awarded in 1936, 16 of the 28 honorees affiliated with United States institutions were foreign-born, including two of the medals awarded last week. But before last week, a woman had never won the honor. Maryan Mirzakhani, an Iranian-born Stanford […]

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The Facts About the Humanitarian Challenge at the Border

Written by on July 10, 2014 in Enforcement, Immigration 101 with 0 Comments
The Facts About the Humanitarian Challenge at the Border

What is our obligation as a country to the unaccompanied child migrants at our border? This seemingly straightforward question is frequently lost among the political debate surrounding the humanitarian challenge at our southern border. In a recent Senate homeland security committee hearing, several senators focused only on how to deter the child migrants. Sen. Johnson […]

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On World Refugee Day, Consider Today’s Migrants Fleeing Violence

Written by on June 20, 2014 in Asylum, Humanitarian Protection, Refugee Status with 0 Comments
On World Refugee Day, Consider Today’s Migrants Fleeing Violence

Governments and organizations around the world mark June 20 by honoring refugees for their struggle and their contribution to their new country with World Refugee Day. As we tackle a humanitarian crisis at the southern border of the United States, this day is an important reminder of why we offer humanitarian protection to individuals fleeing […]

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Migrant Children Flee Violence in Home Countries

Written by on June 12, 2014 in Uncategorized with 0 Comments
Migrant Children Flee Violence in Home Countries

The U.S. is experiencing a growing humanitarian crisis as thousands of children arrive at our southern border after making the harrowing journey from Central America and Mexico to the north. The number on unaccompanied minors arriving has risen at a concerning rate in the past few years and data shows us that the “push” factors […]

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