Ben Winograd

Ben Winograd was a Staff Attorney at the American Immigration Council. He focused on legal issues related to the enforcement of immigration law, including the rights of respondents in removal proceedings and federal collaboration with state and local governments. He received his J.D. cum laude from Georgetown Law in 2010. He worked as a reporter before and during law school, and has written for the Associated Press, SCOTUSblog, and The Wall Street Journal. He also worked as a freelance journalist in Arizona covering border and immigration issues. He is admitted to practice law in California; his practice is limited to cases in federal courts and before the immigration agencies.

STEM Bill Still Plagued by Politics

Written by on November 27, 2012 in Family-Based Immigration, Legislation, Reform with 2 Comments
STEM Bill Still Plagued by Politics

In 2010, the lame duck session of Congress was dominated by debate over the DREAM Act, which passed the House of Representatives before succumbing to a conservative-led filibuster in the Senate. Congress will again tackle a significant immigration measure during the current lame duck session, with the House expected to vote on Friday on a […]

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BREAKING: DACA Approvals Surpass 50,000

Written by on November 16, 2012 in DACA/DAPA, Enforcement, Legislation, News Flash with 3 Comments
BREAKING: DACA Approvals Surpass 50,000

Earlier this afternoon, the Obama administration released updated statistics indicating that 53,273 undocumented youths have been granted relief under the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program. As of November 15, U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) had received more than 300,000 requests for deferred action, with most applicants still awaiting the completion of background […]

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Watchdog Report Offers Misdiagnosis of Immigration Court Backlog

Written by on November 14, 2012 in Enforcement, Immigration Courts, Reform, Right to Counsel with 1 Comment
Watchdog Report Offers Misdiagnosis of Immigration Court Backlog

With more than 325,000 cases pending at the start of October, our nation’s immigration courts are indisputably operating under a crushing backlog. The only question is whether and how it can be resolved. In a little-noticed report issued in early November, the Inspector General of the Justice Department levied a number of criticisms regarding the […]

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In Presidential Election, “Self-Deportation” Goes Down to Defeat

Written by on November 8, 2012 in DACA/DAPA, Demographics, Elections, Integration, Reform with 2 Comments
In Presidential Election, “Self-Deportation” Goes Down to Defeat

It did not become certain until late Tuesday night that President Obama would win re-election. But for Mitt Romney, the campaign may have been lost during the Republican primary, when he cited “self-deportation” as the solution to our nation’s immigration problems. With the post-election dust now settled, it has become increasingly clear that supporting the […]

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Immigrant from Nepal Named U.S. Army’s Soldier of the Year

Written by on November 1, 2012 in Legislation with 0 Comments
Immigrant from Nepal Named U.S. Army’s Soldier of the Year

Immigrants have served with honor in the U.S. armed forces since the Revolutionary War. But in what is believed to be a first, the Army has crowned as its top soldier and an enlistee who was not a U.S. citizen at birth.

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Supreme Court to Consider Reach of Padilla v. Kentucky

Supreme Court to Consider Reach of Padilla v. Kentucky

In its landmark decision in Padilla v. Kentucky, the Supreme Court confirmed that criminal defense attorneys have a constitutional obligation to advise their clients if pleading guilty to a particular offense could lead to deportation. On Thursday,* the Justices will consider a follow-up question of critical importance for many immigrants placed in removal proceedings on […]

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Associated Press Issues Misleading Defense of Term “Illegal Immigrant”

Written by on October 24, 2012 in DACA/DAPA, Demographics, Immigration 101, Reform with 11 Comments
Associated Press Issues Misleading Defense of Term “Illegal Immigrant”

Unlike lawyers and policymakers, journalists have an obligation to use language that ordinary people understand. Although the practice is generally helpful, it can sometimes result in oversimplification, or sacrificing accuracy for the sake of supposed clarity. A perfect example is the memo issued by the Associated Press last week endorsing use of the term “illegal […]

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Los Angeles County Faces Sweeping Suit Over ICE Detainers

Los Angeles County Faces Sweeping Suit Over ICE Detainers

Under the Constitution, it has long been established that the government needs “probable cause” to hold an individual in custody, and that people granted bail must be released once it is paid. In a class-action lawsuit filed last Friday by numerous immigrants’ rights groups, Los Angeles County and Sheriff Lee Baca stand accused of flouting […]

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Pace of DACA Approvals Quickens, but Will it be Fast Enough?

Written by on October 16, 2012 in DACA/DAPA, Elections, Enforcement, Legislation with 11 Comments
Pace of DACA Approvals Quickens, but Will it be Fast Enough?

For the first time since immigration authorities officially launched Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals in mid-August, the federal government released statistics last Friday indicating that thousands of requests have been officially granted. But while the figures themselves are an encouraging sign, other evidence suggests that most applicants will not have their requests considered until after […]

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Supreme Court Case Highlights Cruel Intersection of Immigration and Drug Laws

Supreme Court Case Highlights Cruel Intersection of Immigration and Drug Laws

Tomorrow morning, the Supreme Court will hear arguments in a complicated immigration case involving how courts should determine whether a crime qualifies as an “aggravated felony.” Once the legal clutter is set aside, however, the case provides a clear example of how our nation’s immigration laws often fail to account for the most basic considerations […]

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