Emily Creighton

Emily Creighton is the Deputy Legal Director at the American Immigration Council. She oversees the development of the Council’s legal education, non-litigation advocacy, and Freedom of Information Act work, and supports the Immigration Justice Campaign. Prior to her new role at the Council, she served as the Senior Advisor on Humanitarian Programs at the CIS Ombudsman’s Office from 2016 to 2017. Previous to that, she was a Senior Staff Attorney with the Council. As a staff attorney, she engaged in impact litigation, representing amicus curiae in immigration cases in federal court and before the Board of Immigration Appeals, and authored numerous practice advisories. Emily holds a J.D. from American University Washington College of Law and a B.A. from Boston College.

Diverse Coalitions Urge Supreme Court to Hear Case on Executive Action

Diverse Coalitions Urge Supreme Court to Hear Case on Executive Action

Seven groups have filed amicus briefs in support of a petition for certiorari to the Supreme Court in United States v. Texas, requesting that the Court overturn the Fifth Circuit Court of Appeals decision to enjoin, or halt, the President’s 2014 deferred action initiatives. The briefs were filed on behalf of a diverse range of […]

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Immigration Appeals Court Reverses Position on Deportation Waivers

Immigration Appeals Court Reverses Position on Deportation Waivers

In a decision issued last week, the Board of Immigration Appeals (BIA) reversed course and decided that a subset of Legal Permanent Residents (LPRs) who have been convicted of certain crimes may now have an opportunity to avoid deportation by proving to an immigration judge that their removal would cause extreme hardship to their U.S. […]

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Do the President’s New Immigration Policies Really Mark the End of Secure Communities?

Written by on December 30, 2014 in Interior Enforcement with 0 Comments
Do the President’s New Immigration Policies Really Mark the End of Secure Communities?

The misnamed Secure Communities program has been plagued with problems since its inception—most fundamentally, its failure to make communities more “secure.” Critics of the program have cited to its adverse impact on community policing, asserted that it encourages racial profiling, and highlighted the mounting evidence that many individuals encountered and subsequently removed through the program […]

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Civil Rights Complaint Documents Government’s Failure to Properly Screen Asylum Seekers

Written by on November 14, 2014 in Asylum, Enforcement, Humanitarian Protection with 0 Comments
Civil Rights Complaint Documents Government’s Failure to Properly Screen Asylum Seekers

In a strong condemnation of Customs and Border Protection’s (CBP) treatment of refugees, several organizations submitted a complaint to the Department of Homeland Security Office of Civil Rights and Civil Liberties (OCRCL) detailing the pervasive failure of CBP officers to properly screen individuals who fear persecution. The complaint supplements media accounts, and recent reports by […]

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Inspector General Falls Short in Documenting Border Detention Conditions

Written by on September 16, 2014 in Detention, Enforcement with 2 Comments
Inspector General Falls Short in Documenting Border Detention Conditions

The deplorable conditions in U.S. Border Patrol—an agency within U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP)—detention facilities have been widely documented in numerous media accounts and NGO reports and challenged in federal lawsuits. Immigrant children and other immigrants detained in these facilities—often called “hieleras” or “iceboxes” because of their cold temperatures—consistently describe extremely crowded holding cells […]

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Circuit Court Ruling Affirms Detainers Not Mandatory

Circuit Court Ruling Affirms Detainers Not Mandatory

As communities continue to debate the harmful impact of large scale immigration enforcement programs such as Secure Communities, the 287(g) Program and the Criminal Alien Program, much of the discussion has centered on the use of “detainers.” –  Detainers are requests from Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) to state and local jailers and officials asking […]

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Class Action Settlement Removes Obstacles Preventing Asylum Applicants from Working

Class Action Settlement Removes Obstacles Preventing Asylum Applicants from Working

A recent settlement agreement in a class action lawsuit brought on behalf of thousands of asylum seekers is removing obstacles they faced in obtaining work documents while they pursue their asylum claims. The inability to work for lengthy periods of time has had crippling effects on asylum applicants. Without proper work authorization, they have been […]

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Will USCIS Develop Fair, Humane Travel Policies for DACA Recipients?

Written by on January 23, 2013 in DACA/DAPA, Reform with 5 Comments
Will USCIS Develop Fair, Humane Travel Policies for DACA Recipients?

For many young immigrants who are now lawfully present under the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) initiative—which grants them the right to work and live in the United States for at least two years—the next question may be, when will they be able to travel outside of the United States?  Depending on what guidance […]

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Lawsuit Uncovers USCIS’ Double Standards in H-1B Program

Lawsuit Uncovers USCIS’ Double Standards in H-1B Program

For the past several years, U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services’ (USCIS) H-1B visa review and processing procedures have caused confusion and concern among U.S. businesses that turn to highly-skilled temporary foreign workers in specialty occupations to operate successfully. In newly-uncovered documents, it appears that instead of supporting small businesses that attempt to hire highly-skilled foreign […]

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It’s Time to Improve Noncitizens’ Access to Counsel

Written by on January 23, 2012 in Enforcement, Immigration Courts, Right to Counsel with 0 Comments
It’s Time to Improve Noncitizens’ Access to Counsel

In the United States, most immigration decisions impacting noncitizens are made by immigration officials in informal proceedings far from a courtroom. While the right to an attorney (at the noncitizens’ own expense) in immigration court proceedings is widely recognized, the right to counsel in administrative settings outside of a courtroom is often overlooked or explicitly […]

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