Walter Ewing

Walter A. Ewing, Ph.D., is an Editor and Writer at the American Immigration Council. Walter has authored numerous reports for the Council, including The Criminalization of Immigration in the United States (co-written in 2015 with Daniel Gonzalez and Rubén Rumbaut), which received considerable press attention. He has also published articles in the Journal on Migration and Human Security, Society, the Georgetown Journal of Law and Public Policy, and the Stanford Law and Policy Review, as well as a chapter in Debates on U.S. Immigration, published by SAGE in 2012. Walter holds a Ph.D. in Anthropology from the City University of New York (CUNY).

With Comment Period Expired, Uncertainty Remains About H-1B Registration Process

With Comment Period Expired, Uncertainty Remains About H-1B Registration Process

January 2 marked the final day for comments on a proposed rule by U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) that would implement a new registration requirement for H-1B visas for well-educated foreign professionals. This proposal would require employers looking to hire H-1B workers to first register electronically with the agency during a specified registration period. […]

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Uptick in Worksite Enforcement Hurts US Businesses and Economy

Uptick in Worksite Enforcement Hurts US Businesses and Economy

In its battle against undocumented immigration, the Trump administration appears to be focused on looking tough rather than addressing real problems. Judging from the latest official statistics on the worksite enforcement actions of U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE), the agency is devoting its resources to capturing large numbers of low-level undocumented workers who are […]

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The United States Could Solve Undocumented Immigration With a Better System

Written by on December 4, 2018 in Asylum, Demographics, Economics, Immigration 101 with 0 Comments
The United States Could Solve Undocumented Immigration With a Better System

New estimates indicate that the number of undocumented immigrants in the United States continues a decade-long decline, standing at about 10.7 million as of 2016 (down from 12.2 million in 2007). Just as important as the numbers themselves, however, are the trends that underlie them: migrants are now primarily coming from Central America, not Mexico. […]

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Will American Workers Take Another Hit If President Trump Closes the US-Mexico Border?

Will American Workers Take Another Hit If President Trump Closes the US-Mexico Border?

President Trump wants the Mexican government to turn back the “caravan” of Central American and Mexican asylum-seekers—and he’s threatening to close the U.S.-Mexico border if it doesn’t. In an ominous tweet on November 26, the president declared that if the Mexican government didn’t get a handle on the situation, “We will close the Border permanently […]

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The US Economy Is Strengthened by Foreign-Born Entrepreneurs

The US Economy Is Strengthened by Foreign-Born Entrepreneurs

Many of the billion-dollar startup companies in the United States, such as Uber and SpaceX, would not exist—or would have been created in another country—if U.S. immigration policies had not given the immigrant entrepreneurs the chance to succeed here. Whether immigrant or native-born, entrepreneurs are vital for economic growth and job creation. Many of history’s […]

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How Does Immigration Factor into Americans’ Sense of Identity?

Written by on October 25, 2018 in Demographics, Immigration 101, Integration with 0 Comments
How Does Immigration Factor into Americans’ Sense of Identity?

With the midterm elections fast approaching, immigration has become—yet again—one of the hottest political topics among candidates and likely voters. Much of the public debate over immigration is devoted to topics like the state of “border security” and the causes and effects of undocumented immigration. Beneath these specific issues, however, is a more fundamental question: […]

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The US Healthcare System Benefits From Immigrant Contributors

Written by on October 17, 2018 in Economics, Integration with 0 Comments
The US Healthcare System Benefits From Immigrant Contributors

Insurers have always depended on large numbers of participants to pay into a pool so that those with the highest rates of usage are covered by those with lower rates. In other words, everyone in an insurance pool is interdependent on one another. In the case of private health insurance, immigrants are often helping shore […]

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The United States Must Embrace Global Talent, As High-Skilled Foreign Workers Go Elsewhere

Written by on October 10, 2018 in Business & the Workforce, Economics, High Skilled with 0 Comments
The United States Must Embrace Global Talent, As High-Skilled Foreign Workers Go Elsewhere

If the U.S. government closes the door to highly skilled foreign workers, other countries stand ready to embrace their contributions. For instance, while the Trump administration contemplates an overhaul of the H-1B temporary employment visa, a process that would make it more difficult to obtain them, the Canadian government is offering the opposite. Canada is […]

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New Census Data Show Immigrants Complement Natives in the US Workforce

New Census Data Show Immigrants Complement Natives in the US Workforce

Every year, the Census Bureau releases new data from its American Community Survey (ACS), which contains a wealth of information about the characteristics of the U.S. population. Without fail, this data always underscores the significant extent to which immigrants contribute to the U.S. economy. The 2017 data—released in September 2018—was no exception. As the ACS data […]

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Rural Communities Get Boost From Growing Immigrant Population

Written by on September 12, 2018 in Demographics, Economics with 0 Comments
Rural Communities Get Boost From Growing Immigrant Population

In rural communities throughout the United States, immigration has been a demographic lifeline that offsets—at least in part—the dwindling number of native-born Americans. In fact, as a report from the Center for American Progress (CAP) explains, there are many rural areas in which schools, hospitals, and businesses would have shut their doors if not for […]

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