Backlogs

Immigration Courts Desperately Need More Judges

Written by on August 27, 2015 in Backlogs, Courts with 0 Comments
Immigration Courts Desperately Need More Judges

Although this year’s presidential primary contests are dominated by the topic of immigration, the focus is on politically charged, hot-button issues like border walls and birthright citizenship. And while the media remains transfixed by the inflammatory rhetoric of some candidates, more mundane yet equally important problems go unaddressed. Case in point: immigration court backlogs. While […]

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Bi-Partisan House Bill Recommends Largest Increase Ever in Immigration Judges

Written by on May 21, 2015 in Backlogs, Courts with 3 Comments
Bi-Partisan House Bill Recommends Largest Increase Ever in Immigration Judges

This week, the House Appropriations Committee recommended the largest increase in immigration judges in history—$74 million for 55 new immigration judges, and other court improvements. The bipartisan bill acknowledges that a severe shortage of immigration judges has plagued the U.S. immigration system for years. While Congress has increased immigration enforcement funding exponentially over the past […]

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Why More Immigration Judges Are Needed

Written by on May 11, 2015 in Backlogs, Courts with 1 Comment
Why More Immigration Judges Are Needed

If there is any aspect of immigration reform over which there should be no partisan disagreement, it is the dire need to increase the number of immigration judges. As most Republicans and Democrats can probably agree, immigration judges are essential for the functioning of immigration enforcement (removing people who shouldn’t be here) and for the […]

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Why Are Immigration Court Hearings Being Set Into 2019?

Written by on February 3, 2015 in Backlogs, Border, Courts with 0 Comments
Why Are Immigration Court Hearings Being Set Into 2019?

The immigration court system in the United States is being stretched to the breaking point. Immigration courts have long been expected to do more and more work without the additional funding or personnel needed to do the job effectively. But now, the courts are struggling to handle newer cases involving Central American children and families […]

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Immigration Courts’ Computer Malfunction Slows an Already Crowded System

Immigration Courts’ Computer Malfunction Slows an Already Crowded System

For more than a month, the computer system that manages federal immigration court cases has been down due to a massive malfunction. According to a notice on the website for the Executive Office of Immigration Review (EOIR), which oversees immigration courts, “A hardware failure has resulted in the agency’s inability to perform some functions related […]

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Drop in Court-Ordered Deportations Means Little to Overall Deportation Numbers

Drop in Court-Ordered Deportations Means Little to Overall Deportation Numbers

Last week, the Executive Office for Immigration Review (EOIR)—the division within the Department of Justice that runs that immigration court system—released its FY2013 Statistics Yearbook detailing the number of deportation cases begun and completed in the immigration courts nationwide. The Yearbook showed a decrease in the number of immigration court cases the Department of Homeland […]

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The Washington Post Exposes Sorry State of Immigration Courts

The Washington Post Exposes Sorry State of Immigration Courts

This week, the Washington Post ran a front page article drawing attention to the fact that our nation’s immigration courts are operating in crisis mode.  The immigration courts are so overcrowded that judges are forced to make split-second decisions regarding complex legal issues, calling into question whether the court system is fairly administering justice.  The […]

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Dollars and Lives Lost in the Wait for Immigration Reform

Dollars and Lives Lost in the Wait for Immigration Reform

Two-and-a-half months after the Senate passed immigration reform legislation (S. 744), the House of Representatives continues to dawdle. Other than giving speeches and mulling over a few backward-looking, enforcement-only bills, the House has done nothing to revamp the broken U.S. immigration system or to realistically resolve the status of the 11 million unauthorized immigrants now […]

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How Budget Cuts From Sequestration Will Affect The Nation’s Immigration System

How Budget Cuts From Sequestration Will Affect The Nation’s Immigration System

The U.S.’s immigration system, already burdened by application processing backlogs and insufficient funding for immigration courts, could become even more unwieldy if the government must slash its budget on March 1. Sequestration – a package of across-the-board government spending cuts totaling $85 billion this year and $1.2 trillion over the next decade – likely will […]

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Survey: Asian Americans Concerned with Legalization, Family Backlogs

Survey: Asian Americans Concerned with Legalization, Family Backlogs

In the current debate, immigration is often depicted as a Latino issue.  This is partially because just over half of America’s foreign-born population is from Latin America and the Caribbean, and the current political climate around immigration is largely seen as being driven by Latino turnout for Democrats in the 2012 election.  But this depiction […]

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