Tag: Supreme Court

Hawaii Judge Rules That Grandparents and Other Close Relatives Are Excluded from the Travel Ban

Hawaii Judge Rules That Grandparents and Other Close Relatives Are Excluded from the Travel Ban

This story was updated on July 19, 2017. U.S. District Judge Derrick Watson ruled last week that “grandparents, grandchildren, brothers-in-law, sisters-in-law, aunts, uncles, nieces, nephews, and cousins of persons in the United States,” as well as refugees connected to resettlement agencies should be exempt from the Trump administration’s travel ban. This ruling came as a […]

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Who Will and Won’t Be Impacted by the Travel Ban After the Supreme Court’s Decision

Who Will and Won’t Be Impacted by the Travel Ban After the Supreme Court’s Decision

The Supreme Court has decided to hear the Travel Ban case when its fall session begins in October 2017. In the meantime, the Court will allow the administration to implement parts of President Trump’s second executive order (EO-2), which bans the entry of nationals of Iran, Libya, Somalia, Sudan, Syria, and Yemen from the United […]

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Supreme Court Sends a ‘Dangerous Message’ by Not Finding Bush Officials Liable in Post-9/11 Abuse Case

Written by on June 21, 2017 in Abuses, Detention, Federal Courts/Jurisdiction with 0 Comments
Supreme Court Sends a ‘Dangerous Message’ by Not Finding Bush Officials Liable in Post-9/11 Abuse Case

A bare majority of the Supreme Court ruled on Monday that six former immigrants of Arab or South Asian descent—all but one of whom are Muslim—cannot sue high-level U.S. officials over policies that authorized punitive detention conditions in the wake of September 11, 2001. The six plaintiffs in Zigler v. Abbasi were swept up in […]

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“Immigration, Even for the President, Is Not a One-Person Show”: The Ninth Circuit Rejects Trump’s Travel Ban

“Immigration, Even for the President, Is Not a One-Person Show”: The Ninth Circuit Rejects Trump’s Travel Ban

Barely three weeks after the Fourth Circuit ruled that President Trump’s travel ban “drips with religious intolerance, animus, and discrimination” and thus violated the First Amendment by discriminating against Muslims, the Ninth Circuit ruled that the travel ban also violated the Immigration and Nationality Act (INA). In upholding a Hawaii federal district court decision that […]

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Supreme Court Rejects Asylum Seekers’ Petition for Federal Court Review

Supreme Court Rejects Asylum Seekers’ Petition for Federal Court Review

The Supreme Court denied review in Castro v. Department of Homeland Security on Monday, which involves dozens of asylum-seeking mothers and children at risk of deportation. The Central American plaintiffs in the case—28 mothers and their 33 children, many of whom have been detained for over a year—fled north to the United States after escaping […]

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Immigrants Could Get a Second Chance in Court If Their Lawyers Give Them Bad Advice

Immigrants Could Get a Second Chance in Court If Their Lawyers Give Them Bad Advice

Immigrants rely heavily on the advice of their lawyers, often times entrusting their entire livelihood on the merits of the counsel. But what happens when a lawyer gives their client bad advice, and that advice becomes the catalyst for their deportation? This is the question the Supreme Court tackled on Tuesday, asking whether an immigrant […]

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Supreme Court Hears Case on Shooting of Sergio Hernandez by U.S. Border Patrol Agent

Written by on February 22, 2017 in Abuses, Enforcement, Federal Courts/Jurisdiction with 1 Comment
Supreme Court Hears Case on Shooting of Sergio Hernandez by U.S. Border Patrol Agent

Officers with U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP)—the federal agency which includes the Border Patrol—are rarely held accountable for their actions. Nowhere is this more apparent than in the case of Sergio Hernandez, a 15-year-old boy shot dead in 2010 in Mexico by a Border Patrol agent who fired on him from the U.S. side […]

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Supreme Court Nominee Neil Gorsuch on Immigration

Supreme Court Nominee Neil Gorsuch on Immigration

President Donald Trump announced his choice Tuesday to fill the Supreme Court vacancy left by the death of Justice Antonin Scalia nearly one year ago. In nominating Tenth Circuit Judge Neil Gorsuch, a Harvard Law School graduate who was confirmed to the Tenth Circuit Court of Appeals in 2006, President Trump has effectively chosen to […]

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Supreme Court Weighs Challenge to Vague Grounds of Deportation

Written by on January 19, 2017 in Federal Courts/Jurisdiction with 0 Comments
Supreme Court Weighs Challenge to Vague Grounds of Deportation

Determining when an immigrant who has been convicted of a crime can be deported is a feat that has been described by federal judges as “far from clear,” “dizzying,” and “labyrinthine.” There is no doubt that the intersection of criminal and immigration law is complex, but how vague can a statute be before it is […]

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Supreme Court Considers Challenge to Detention of Immigrants Without Bond Hearings

Supreme Court Considers Challenge to Detention of Immigrants Without Bond Hearings

The Supreme Court heard arguments this week in what may be the most important immigration case on its docket this fall, Jennings v. Rodriguez. The case, which began as a class action filed in California, raises important questions about whether the government has the authority to categorically deny certain detained immigrants the right to have […]

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