Beth Werlin

Beth Werlin is the Deputy Director and Litigation Clearinghouse Attorney at the Legal Action Center. The Litigation Clearinghouse serves as a national point of contact for lawyers conducting or contemplating immigration litigation. Ms. Werlin joined the American Immigration Council as a NAPIL Fellow in 2001 and was a staff attorney from 2003 until 2005. She has represented plaintiffs and amicus curiae in immigration litigation in the federal courts and before the Board of Immigration Appeals.

Report Discloses Deportation of Central American Asylum Seekers

Written by on October 21, 2014 in Asylum and Refugee, Deportation with 1 Comment
Report Discloses Deportation of Central American Asylum Seekers

Human Rights Watch (HRW) issued a report last week documenting serious flaws in the procedures used to deport noncitizens apprehended at or near the border—flaws that are resulting in the deportation of Central Americans who face serious harm in their home countries. The report is based on interviews of 35 noncitizens detained in the United […]

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Why We Are Suing the Government on Behalf of All Children Facing Deportation

Why We Are Suing the Government on Behalf of All Children Facing Deportation

The thousands of children fleeing violence and persecution and seeking refuge in the United States have brought to the forefront the issue of how our immigration system deals with children. The current system subjects kids to the same deportation laws as adults. They are ordered to appear in immigration court, where they face off against […]

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Summary Removal Procedures and Their Role in Rising Deportations

Written by on May 28, 2014 in Administration, Deportation with 0 Comments
Summary Removal Procedures and Their Role in Rising Deportations

A string of new reports and analysis have resulted in competing story lines around the deportation numbers. The question of whether current policies are indiscriminate and inhumane, or whether the Obama administration is ignoring the law and “can’t be trusted” are dominating the politics around the immigration debate today. However, a debate focused exclusively on […]

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Drop in Court-Ordered Deportations Means Little to Overall Deportation Numbers

Drop in Court-Ordered Deportations Means Little to Overall Deportation Numbers

Last week, the Executive Office for Immigration Review (EOIR)—the division within the Department of Justice that runs that immigration court system—released its FY2013 Statistics Yearbook detailing the number of deportation cases begun and completed in the immigration courts nationwide. The Yearbook showed a decrease in the number of immigration court cases the Department of Homeland […]

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Petition Challenges DHS on Enforcement Priorities

Petition Challenges DHS on Enforcement Priorities

Last week, the National Day Laborer Organizing Network (NDLON) along with six individuals, submitted a formal request to the Department of Homeland Security asking the agency to temporarily suspend the deportation of low-priority undocumented workers and their families and grant them “deferred action.” Deferred action is a discretionary decision by the government not to pursue […]

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The Washington Post Exposes Sorry State of Immigration Courts

The Washington Post Exposes Sorry State of Immigration Courts

This week, the Washington Post ran a front page article drawing attention to the fact that our nation’s immigration courts are operating in crisis mode.  The immigration courts are so overcrowded that judges are forced to make split-second decisions regarding complex legal issues, calling into question whether the court system is fairly administering justice.  The […]

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USCIS to Offer Stay of Deportation to Certain Military Family Members

Written by on November 15, 2013 in Children, Family, Military, USCIS with 2 Comments
USCIS to Offer Stay of Deportation to Certain Military Family Members

Today, USCIS issued guidance that is intended to prevent current and former members of the U.S. armed forces from being separated from their noncitizen family members.  The memo indicates that the noncitizen family members may be afforded “parole in place.”  “Parole in place” is a discretionary tool that allows a noncitizen who is in the […]

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How the Supreme Court Decision on DOMA Will Impact Immigration Law

Written by on March 26, 2013 in Constitution, Courts, DOMA, Immigration Law, Supreme Court with 0 Comments
How the Supreme Court Decision on DOMA Will Impact Immigration Law

Family unity is one of the driving forces in our immigration system.  United States citizens and lawful permanent residents can obtain immigrant visas for their spouses.  Many foreign nationals who come to the United States on employment-based visas bring their spouses and children with them.  And some waivers and forms of relief from removal are […]

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Hearing and Report Highlight Lack of Due Process in Immigration System

Hearing and Report Highlight Lack of Due Process in Immigration System

This week, Senator Christopher Coons of Delaware presided over a public hearing to discuss what so many of us know:  the immigration courts are failing to provide a fair, efficient, and effective system of justice.  Many of the concerns raised by Senator Coons, as well as some of the witnesses, during Wednesday’s Senate Judiciary Committee […]

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SCOTUS Narrows Protections For Noncitizens Who Received Poor Legal Advice

SCOTUS Narrows Protections For Noncitizens Who Received Poor Legal Advice

Almost three years ago, in the landmark decision Padilla v. Kentucky, the Supreme Court acknowledged the severity of deportation and that our current immigration laws make “removal nearly an automatic result” for many noncitizens convicted of crimes.  Consequently, the Court held that a criminal defense attorney must advise noncitizen clients about the risks of deportation […]

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