Guillermo Cantor

Guillermo Cantor is the Deputy Director of Research at the Immigration Policy Center, where he leads the Center’s research efforts. He also currently teaches courses on immigration and introductory sociology at Georgetown University. He has authored several publications on immigrant incorporation in the United States and Argentina. Prior to joining the American Immigration Council, Mr. Cantor served as an investigator on issues related to immigration at Argentina’s National Council for Scientific and Technical Research and as a professor at the National University of Rosario and the National University of Entre Ríos. Throughout his career, Mr. Cantor received multiple distinctions including a Fulbright Fellowship, the Urban Institute's Emerging Scholar Award, and the International Development Research Center's Research Award. Mr. Cantor holds a Ph.D. in Sociology from the University of Maryland, College Park.

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Who and Where Are the Actual and Potential Beneficiaries of DACA?

Written by on August 12, 2015 in Deferred Action, Demographics, USCIS with 0 Comments
Who and Where Are the Actual and Potential Beneficiaries of DACA?

Since the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program was first implemented in August 2012, hundreds of thousands of young immigrants were provided with a temporary reprieve from deportation and access to work authorization. As of March 31, 2015, U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) had accepted just about 750,000 initial requests and granted DACA […]

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Study Estimates the Impact of New Priority Enforcement Policies on Deportation Numbers

Study Estimates the Impact of New Priority Enforcement Policies on Deportation Numbers

The Migration Policy Institute released a new report that examines the potential impact of the Department of Homeland Security’s (DHS) new policy guidance for immigration enforcement, which attempts to focus immigration enforcement more specifically on certain categories of individuals while, according to Homeland Security Secretary Jeh Johnson, “deprioritizing those undocumented who have been here for […]

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CBP Advisory Panel Recommends Revising Use of Force Policies and Adding Investigators

Written by on July 10, 2015 in Customs and Border Protection with 0 Comments
CBP Advisory Panel Recommends Revising Use of Force Policies and Adding Investigators

Last week, the U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) Integrity Advisory Panel, whose creation was directed by the Secretary of Homeland Security in December 2014, released a report recommending specific steps CBP should take in order to increase transparency, assure integrity, and ensure compliance with use of force policy. The recommendations include both staffing and policy […]

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Immigrants Kept for Days in Border Patrol’s Bedless Holding Cells

Immigrants Kept for Days in Border Patrol’s Bedless Holding Cells

Every day, over a thousand individuals are held in Border Patrol detention facilities near the U.S. southern border. These facilities are notorious for freezing cold temperatures, overcrowded conditions and lack of any bedding or beds. In addition, they routinely lack adequate food, water, and medical care. The reality is that these facilities are not designed […]

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Without Legalization, State Policies Remain Crucial to Healthy Communities

Without Legalization, State Policies Remain Crucial to Healthy Communities

In the absence of meaningful immigration reform to address the situation of the millions of undocumented individuals living in the United States, state policies have become more and more important. One of the areas in which that is especially true is public health. It is unquestionable that healthy communities require broad access to health care. However, for […]

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How Families Are Kept Apart by Current Immigration Laws

Written by on April 10, 2015 in Family with 3 Comments
How Families Are Kept Apart by Current Immigration Laws

Family reunification has stood as a central pillar of the U.S. immigration system, dating back to 1965. Despite this, a new study by researchers Maria Enchautegui and Cecilia Menjivar shows that current immigration laws actually work to keep many families apart. Not surprisingly, the authors’ analysis reveals that immigrant households have a “high incidence of persons […]

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New Study Finds Systematic Bias in Labor Certification Process

Written by on January 15, 2015 in Department of Labor, Employment with 0 Comments
New Study Finds Systematic Bias in Labor Certification Process

In most cases, when an employer is interested in hiring a foreign national to work in the United States on a permanent basis, a permanent labor certification from the Department of Labor (DOL) is necessary. When required, the DOL must certify to the United States Citizenship and Immigration Services that (a) there are insufficient U.S. […]

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Immigration Restrictionists Exploit Ebola Tragedy

Written by on October 20, 2014 in Myths, Restrictionists, Rhetoric with 1 Comment
Immigration Restrictionists Exploit Ebola Tragedy

As the Ebola outbreak continues to take lives in West Africa, restrictionists have predictably started their  “crusade” to ban travel from West African countries. Specifically, over the past few weeks, nativist groups such as the Center for Immigration Studies (CIS) and the Federation for American Immigration Reform (FAIR) as well as some lawmakers started criticizing […]

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Will CBP Actions Increase Transparency and Accountability?

Written by on September 24, 2014 in Customs and Border Protection with 0 Comments
Will CBP Actions Increase Transparency and Accountability?

Customs and Border Protection (CBP) frequently refers to itself as the nation’s largest law enforcement agency, yet many of its practices fail to live up to the expectations and standards by which modern, civilian police forces are measured. A constant barrage of advocacy and evidence pointing to CBP’s weaknesses in handling a range of complaints […]

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Immigrants Work in More Arduous Jobs than U.S. Natives, New Study Shows

Written by on August 12, 2014 in Economics, Myths, Restrictionists with 0 Comments
Immigrants Work in More Arduous Jobs than U.S. Natives, New Study Shows

One of the reasons often cited to explain the importance of immigrant workers to the U.S. economy is the presumption that immigrants perform jobs that U.S. natives are unwilling to take. Numerous studies show that immigrant workers complement the native-born in various ways. But in spite of the growing evidence, restrictionist groups recurrently argue that […]

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