Walter Ewing

Walter Ewing, Ph.D., is Senior Researcher at the American Immigration Council. In addition to authoring numerous reports for the Council, he has published articles in the Journal on Migration and Human Security, Society, the Georgetown Journal of Law and Public Policy, and the Stanford Law and Policy Review. He also authored a chapter in Debates on U.S. Immigration, published by SAGE in 2012. Mr. Ewing received his Ph.D. in Anthropology from the City University of New York (CUNY) Graduate School in 1997. Follow him on Twitter @WalterAEwing.

The Ideological Roots of Donald Trump’s Immigration Team

Written by on November 15, 2016 in Elections, History of Immigration with 0 Comments
The Ideological Roots of Donald Trump’s Immigration Team

As President-Elect Donald Trump names his choices for key positions in his administration, it is clear that he intends to include quite a few people who subscribe to fringe, alt-right, racist ideologies. For example, Steve Bannon, named as Chief Strategist, is known for his white nationalist views and anti-Semitism. The people being named to lead […]

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New Census Numbers Underscore Importance of Immigration

Written by on November 4, 2016 in Demographics with 0 Comments
New Census Numbers Underscore Importance of Immigration

There is no denying that the number of foreign-born individuals in the United States has increased in recent years. According to the Pew Research Center, the foreign-born population rose from 39.9 million in 2010 to 42.2 million in 2014. This is good news for a nation and economy that have long benefited from immigration. However, […]

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Contemplating Our Immigrant Future

Written by on October 31, 2016 in Economics, Reform with 0 Comments
Contemplating Our Immigrant Future

One of the many lessons to be learned from this year’s presidential campaign is that immigration is far too complex to be captured by political slogans and soundbites. Whether a candidate is trying to “build walls” or “build bridges,” the reality of immigration is finely nuanced. The United States neither welcomes all immigrants nor does […]

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El Salvador’s Gang Violence is Forcing Thousands to Flee

Written by on October 21, 2016 in Refugee Status with 0 Comments
El Salvador’s Gang Violence is Forcing Thousands to Flee

In the event that there was any doubt, women and children from Central America’s Northern Triangle—El Salvador, Guatemala, and Honduras—are fleeing the same horrific conditions that were driving them out of their countries in large numbers two years ago. That is why apprehensions of Northern Triangle refugees have gone up this year, once again drawing […]

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History Shows That Border Walls Don’t Work

Written by on October 18, 2016 in Border Enforcement with 1 Comment
History Shows That Border Walls Don’t Work

A border wall is a powerful symbol of exclusion: “We” are going to keep “them” out. And, by doing so, “we” are going to protect our people, our way of life, our society and economy from the threat that “they” represent. It’s a concept that is elegant in its simplicity. It’s the concept that launched […]

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Sensible Immigration Policies Enhance U.S. National Security

Sensible Immigration Policies Enhance U.S. National Security

Putting down a welcome mat for immigrants—rather than building a wall—ultimately makes the United States a more secure nation. Of course, measures that ensure we keep those out who represent a risk to public safety or national security are important. But trying to keep everybody out—be it foreigners in general or all foreigners of particular […]

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Investing in the Children of Immigrants is Critical for American Economy

Written by on September 26, 2016 in Economics, Immigration 101, Integration, Tax Contributions with 0 Comments
Investing in the Children of Immigrants is Critical for American Economy

Immigrants make many contributions to the U.S. economy through their labor power, purchasing power, tax payments, business formation and scientific innovation. Some of these contributions are captured in traditional cost-benefit analyses; others are not. But one of their most valuable economic contributions comes in the form of their native-born children. These children—the immigrant “second generation”—tend […]

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Why Restricting Immigration Won’t Improve Work Opportunities for Natives

Why Restricting Immigration Won’t Improve Work Opportunities for Natives

Serious economists know that immigrant and native-born workers cannot simply be swapped for one another like batteries. On average, immigrants and the native-born differ in terms of formal education, job experience, and English-language skills. As a result, immigrants and the native-born tend to “complement” each other rather than directly compete. Even among workers with the […]

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Why Going Home First to Get Legal Status (“Touchback”) Makes No Sense

Written by on August 30, 2016 in Elections, Enforcement, Interior Enforcement with 0 Comments
Why Going Home First to Get Legal Status (“Touchback”) Makes No Sense

No one is quite sure where Donald Trump stands on immigration anymore. More precisely, experts are trying to divine what Trump would do with the 11 million undocumented immigrants now living in the country. When he first launched his campaign, Trump proposed a “deportation force” that would, presumably, expel undocumented immigrants—and their U.S.-citizen children—from the […]

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Softening Rhetoric but No Immigration Policy Shift From Donald Trump

Written by on August 25, 2016 in Elections with 0 Comments
Softening Rhetoric but No Immigration Policy Shift From Donald Trump

When it comes to immigration, Donald Trump is big on rhetoric and short on substance. This is why no one is quite sure what to make of Trump’s change in tone as to what should be done about the 11 million undocumented immigrants currently living in the United States. In an August 24 town hall-style […]

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