Amy Grenier

Amy Grenier was the Administrative and Research Assistant at the Immigration Policy Center. Amy has a B.A. in History from Hollins University and an M.A. in Migration Studies from the University of Sussex, where she wrote her thesis on federalism, immigration, and state level activism in the United States. She also studied briefly at Ho Chi Minh International University, where a course on the Vietnamese diaspora piqued her interest in immigrant communities in the United States. Previously, she has interned for the U.S. Committee for Refugees and Immigrants, served as a volunteer coordinator for a refugee charity in the United Kingdom, and worked as a legal secretary for a regulatory law firm.

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Report Finds Border Patrol Deporting Children Without Proper Screening

Written by on July 17, 2015 in Enforcement with 0 Comments
Report Finds Border Patrol Deporting Children Without Proper Screening

A recent U.S. government report found that the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) deported thousands of Mexican unaccompanied alien children (UACs) under age 14 in violation of its own policies, without adequately screening them for independent decision-making or their fear of returning to Mexico.

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New Memo on Detained Transgender Immigrants Does Not Go Far Enough

Written by on July 6, 2015 in Detention with 1 Comment
New Memo on Detained Transgender Immigrants Does Not Go Far Enough

U.S. Immigration Customs Enforcement (ICE) will shift its policies regarding transgender adult detainees in its custody according to a memo released last week. While the changes seem positive, they still fall short according to LGBTI and immigration advocates.

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Why Our Humanitarian Obligations to Children Crossing the Border Still Matter

Written by on June 26, 2015 in Detention, Enforcement, Humanitarian Protection with 1 Comment
Why Our Humanitarian Obligations to Children Crossing the Border Still Matter

Last summer, the flow of Central Americans seeking refuge in the United States—many of them children—reached its height. One of the government’s first responses to the increased numbers was to reinstitute family detention, with the opening of a makeshift facility in Artesia, New Mexico, one year ago tomorrow. Today, the flow at our southern border […]

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Son of Migrant Farmworkers Named U.S. Poet Laureate

Written by on June 17, 2015 in Integration with 0 Comments
Son of Migrant Farmworkers Named U.S. Poet Laureate

The next poet laureate of the United States is Juan Felipe Herrera, the son of migrant farm workers. Herrera will be the first-ever Chicano poet laureate, signaling, as the Los Angeles Times put it, “…an acknowledgment of the importance of Spanish and bilingual culture in America.” Herrera writes in English and Spanish, often using both […]

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After Earthquake in Nepal, Bill Introduced to Grant Temporary Protected Status to Nepalese Nationals

Written by on May 4, 2015 in Legislation, Temporary Protected Status with 1 Comment
After Earthquake in Nepal, Bill Introduced to Grant Temporary Protected Status to Nepalese Nationals

One form of humanitarian assistance the United States can offer to Nepal, a country now recovering from the 7.8 magnitude earthquake that flattened buildings and killed more than 7,000 people, is temporary protected status (TPS) for Nepalese nationals who currently are in the United States. Last week, several members of Congress introduced a bill, H.R. […]

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Private Prison Industry Lobbies for Detention of Immigrants

Written by on April 22, 2015 in Detention with 1 Comment
Private Prison Industry Lobbies for Detention of Immigrants

Since 2009, Congress has instructed the U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) to maintain 34,000 beds in immigrant detention facilities across the country, a policy known as “the bed mandate.” This mandate costs the American taxpayer $5.05 million per day–or $159 a day per immigrant detainee. A new report released this week by Grassroots Leadership […]

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House Judiciary Considers Same Costly, Enforcement-Only ‘Reform’

Written by on March 5, 2015 in Enforcement, Humanitarian Protection, Legislation with 0 Comments
House Judiciary Considers Same Costly, Enforcement-Only ‘Reform’

The House Judiciary Committee devoted two days this week to the markup of three enforcement-only immigration bills. The legislation would strip much-needed protections from an already vulnerable population–including children and asylum seekers–impact the agriculture industry, place burdensome requirements on small business owners, and cost the American taxpayer a lot of money. The Legal Workforce Act, […]

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White House Proposes Plan to Address Causes of Children Fleeing Central America

Written by on February 4, 2015 in Uncategorized with 1 Comment
White House Proposes Plan to Address Causes of Children Fleeing Central America

President Obama requested $1 billion in his fiscal year 2016 budget proposal to address the root causes of unaccompanied children fleeing to the United States. Vice President Joe Biden announced the plan for these funds in a New York Times op-ed, saying that “[a]s we were reminded last summer when thousands of unaccompanied children showed […]

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How Thousands of U.S. Citizen Children Are Impacted by Removal of Parents

Written by on January 14, 2015 in Enforcement with 1 Comment
How Thousands of U.S. Citizen Children Are Impacted by Removal of Parents

While the President’s recent executive actions will help some parents of U.S. citizens, current border removal policies continue to separate U.S. citizen children from their parents, according to a new report by Human Rights Watch. Using data obtained through the Freedom of Information Act, the authors calculated that 15 percent (or 101,900) of migrants removed […]

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State Department Launches In-Country Refugee Program to Reunite Central American Families

Written by on December 9, 2014 in Humanitarian Protection, Refugee Status with 0 Comments
State Department Launches In-Country Refugee Program to Reunite Central American Families

Last week, the U.S. Department of State announced the launch of its in-country refugee processing program in El Salvador, Guatemala, and Honduras. The program is part of the Obama Administration’s response to last summer’s influx of unaccompanied children and families fleeing to the United States from Central America and will work to “to provide a […]

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