Kristin Macleod-Ball

Kristin Macleod-Ball is a Staff Attorney with the American Immigration Council. While a law student, she served clients seeking relief in immigration court, applying for benefits with USCIS and challenging racial profiling by local police. Kristin helped to document problematic examples of state and local involvement in immigration enforcement as an intern with AILA. She has also worked with legal services organizations to advocate on behalf of tenants in foreclosed properties and residents of manufactured housing. Prior to law school, Kristin worked with WITNESS, an organization that assisted locally-based non-profits around the world to produce and distribute human rights advocacy videos. She is a graduate of Bard College and Yale Law School.

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Government Ordered to Promptly Release Children From Family Detention

Written by on August 24, 2015 in Courts, Detention with 0 Comments
Government Ordered to Promptly Release Children From Family Detention

In a decision issued Friday, a district court in California ruled yet again that the government is violating a long-standing settlement agreement protecting the rights of children in immigration detention. Advocates for immigrant children went to court in February to argue that the government’s family detention centers violate the Flores v. Reno settlement agreement, which […]

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Government Doubles Down on Locking Up Immigrant Mothers and Children

Written by on August 10, 2015 in Detention with 1 Comment
Government Doubles Down on Locking Up Immigrant Mothers and Children

The government continued to defend its widespread detention of asylum-seeking women and children in documents filed last week in the Flores case. Advocates went to court in February to argue that the government’s family detention centers violate the long-standing Flores v. Reno settlement agreement, which set minimum standards for the detention, release and treatment of […]

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Court Reportedly Set to Order End to Detention of Children in Unlicensed Family Facilities

Written by on May 14, 2015 in Courts, Detention with 1 Comment
Court Reportedly Set to Order End to Detention of Children in Unlicensed Family Facilities

In February, advocates went to court to argue that the government’s family detention centers violate the long-standing Flores v. Reno settlement agreement, which set minimum standards for the detention, release and treatment of children subject to immigration detention. In response, government attorneys claimed that the Flores settlement should not apply to children in family detention. […]

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Supreme Court to Decide Whether It’s Okay to Deprive a Person of His Day In Immigration Court

Written by on April 30, 2015 in Supreme Court with 0 Comments
Supreme Court to Decide Whether It’s Okay to Deprive a Person of His Day In Immigration Court

Every day in immigration courts around the country, people facing deportation try to explain why they should be allowed to remain in the United States under our notoriously complex immigration laws. Those who have legal representation rely on their attorneys to follow procedures and make arguments that may be virtually indecipherable to people without legal […]

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Government Claims Children in Family Detention Centers Are Not Entitled to Protections

Written by on March 18, 2015 in Children, Detention, Family with 0 Comments
Government Claims Children in Family Detention Centers Are Not Entitled to Protections

The outcry against the detention of children and women seeking protection from violence continues. Just yesterday, over 95 national and local civil rights, human rights, immigrants’ rights, and religious organizations sent a letter to President Obama outlining the mounting criticism of family detention and urging the Administration to follow a recent federal court decision denouncing […]

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The Detention of Children and Their Families is Still Unjust and Still Against the Law

The Detention of Children and Their Families is Still Unjust and Still Against the Law

Detaining immigrant children is nothing new. In 1997, the government settled a lawsuit, Flores v. Reno, about the inhumane treatment of immigrant children held in detention. The settlement agreement said officials would follow a set of minimum national standards for the detention, release, and treatment of children subject to immigration detention. That agreement is still […]

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Unrepresented Children Still Being Fast-Tracked Through Immigration Hearings

Written by on February 6, 2015 in Children, Courts, Deportation, Immigration Law with 6 Comments
Unrepresented Children Still Being Fast-Tracked Through Immigration Hearings

Since the government began “prioritizing” the deportation of unaccompanied children and mothers with children last summer, legal service providers and other court observers across the country have reported that immigration judges are giving children less time to find attorneys before moving forward in their cases. Now, children without attorneys are being forced to explain why, […]

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When is Possession of a Sock a Deportable Offense?

Written by on January 22, 2015 in Deportation, Supreme Court with 0 Comments
When is Possession of a Sock a Deportable Offense?

Last week, the Supreme Court heard oral arguments in Mellouli v. Holder, No. 13-1034, a case that shows just how out of step immigration enforcement has become. Moones Mellouli was a conditional lawful permanent resident engaged to a U.S. citizen and resided in the U.S. for 8 years, but was ordered removed as the result […]

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Unaccompanied Children Deserve Fair Representation in Immigration Courts

Unaccompanied Children Deserve Fair Representation in Immigration Courts

News stories and NGO reports continue to document the plight of “unaccompanied children,” and their complex legal issues were brought to the attention of Congress when Attorney General Eric Holder told the House Judiciary Committee last month that the Department of Justice needs to do more to address the problem of unaccompanied children in immigration […]

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Miranda-like Warning for Immigrants Argued in Ninth Circuit

Miranda-like Warning for Immigrants Argued in Ninth Circuit

Courts have long recognized that the Constitution requires police officers to inform arrested suspects of their rights—called Miranda warnings in criminal cases—before questioning them about crimes they are accused of committing. The risk is too great that a suspect who is not free to leave and is unaware of his rights would confess only due […]

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